Gibraltar, Europe - JiveHippo.travel

Start Your Search

    • 16+ years
    • 12-15 years
    • 2-11 years
    • 0-23 months

Welcome to Gibraltar

Gibraltar

Information & Facts

Attraction Overview

Gibraltar may only have an area of 2.3 square miles, but what it lacks in size it makes up for in character and charm. Huddled next to Spain, Gibraltar sits at the tip of the Strait and at the crossroads between Europe and Africa. As one of the last bastions of the British empire, Gibraltar has been under British rule since 1713. The strong British influences are still evident today, yet a very cosmopolitan air reminds you that this is far from your average British seaside resort.

The prime position of Gibraltar makes it a great location for a short break. It's just a stone's throw from Spain, so a day trip from Gibraltar can see you exploring the Spanish cities of Granada and Jerez, with the bustling coastal resorts of the Costa del Sol within easy reach. The attractive mountain villages of Andalucia are all easily accessible, as are the laid-back beaches of the Costa de la Luz. For a taste of the exotic, a high-speed ferry from nearby Algeciras can transport you to Morocco for the day.

When choosing JiveHippo for your holiday in Gibraltar, however, you will find that there is plenty to do to keep you entertained in Gibraltar itself. Most notably, the Rock is the most popular visitor attraction and is well worth the visit for the views from the top. From this impressive limestone ridge rising over 400m you can enjoy views over the whole of Gibraltar, as well as the Andalucian coast and out towards Morocco across the Strait. Cable cars take you to the top of the Rock, where the main attraction is the resident troop of macaque apes. They are a delight to watch as they get up to their cheeky antics.
Saint Michael's Cave should feature on your itinerary as you head back down the Rock. This natural grotto, complete with stalactites and stalagmites, was once home to Neolithic dwellers of the Rock but is now used for concerts and plays.
Further down, you will find the entrance to the 18th-century Great Siege Tunnel, which was built by the British to protect against invasion during the war. There is said to be over 40 miles of tunnels dug out within the Rock, most of which are not open to the public.
If you are interested in delving into Gibraltar's intriguing history, then a visit to both the Military Heritage Museum and the Gibraltar Museum can offer great insight into the lively historical past of this small country.
Once you have explored the Rock, a stroll around the town is an ideal way to get a feel for the place. As well as evidence of its British heritage, such as red pillar boxes, signs in English and fish and chip shops, there is also a very cosmopolitan, Mediterranean influence that creates a very charming atmosphere. As well as the usual British eating establishments, you can expect to find chic bistros and fine-dining establishments, offering a wide choice for the visitor. Casemates Square is a good stopping point to enjoy a cooling drink. The harbour and marina area is also a pleasant place to while away your time watching the daily activity of the boats and yachts.
 
For a slice of tranquillity, head to the 19th-century Alameda Gardens, which are considered among the finest in the world.
If you are looking for some action and adventure, then Gibraltar will not disappoint. The area around the harbour is said to be excellent for diving enthusiasts, and you can expect to explore ancient underwater wrecks. If you prefer staying above the water, then a whale-watching tour into the Strait can be rewarding, as this is said to be a breeding area for dolphins and home to various species of whales. Those looking to soak up the sun should head to the eastern side of the town for the best beaches.
For a slice of tranquillity, head to the 19th-century Alameda Gardens, which are considered among the finest in the world.
If you are looking for some action and adventure, then Gibraltar will not disappoint. The area around the harbour is said to be excellent for diving enthusiasts, and you can expect to explore ancient underwater wrecks. If you prefer staying above the water, then a whale-watching tour into the Strait can be rewarding, as this is said to be a breeding area for dolphins and home to various species of whales. Those looking to soak up the sun should head to the eastern side of the town for the best beaches.

Climate

Gibraltar enjoys a typical Mediterranean climate, with mild winters and warm, dry summers. In spring and autumn, average temperatures sit around the 20-degrees mark. During the peak months of July and August, expect to see the mercury rise to around 30 degrees.

Duty Free

Shopping is a real treat in Gibraltar. It's a duty-free and VAT-free haven, so visitors can expect to find a plethora of bargains. Main Street is the centre of the shopping zone, where you can expect to find familiar stores such as Marks and Spencer interspersed with local names selling souvenirs and the like.

Getting Around

Because of the compact size of Gibraltar, it has a limited public transport system.

You will be able to catch the local buses, which have a total of eight different bus routes.

Taxi cabs are available, you will be able to call and order a taxi from any taxi rank or the city centre. 

Jump the cable car, which runs from the south of the city centre to the top of the Rock.

Health

If you are a British national and you live in the UK, you will be able to get emergency treatment by presenting your passport.

If you need urgent treatment, which means that you will need to be transported to Spain, your UK passport will not cover this. Make sure that you get your European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) or that you have health insurance and accessible funds to be able to cover any treatment needed.

Language

As a British territory, the official language spoken in Gibraltar is English. Its close proximity to Spain means that Spanish is also widely spoken, and locals also have their own native tongue called Llanito, which is based on a mixture of languages.

Money

As a British territory, the official language spoken in Gibraltar is English. Its close proximity to Spain means that Spanish is also widely spoken, and locals also have their own native tongue called Llanito, which is based on a mixture of languages.

Safety

Crime in Gibraltar is very rare, however like anywhere in the world, there have been reports of crime happening.

 

Time

Gibraltar are under the Central European Time Zone (UTC+01:00).

ACCEPT COOKIESTo give you the best possible experience, this site uses cookies. Using this site means you agree to our use of cookies. We have published a cookies policy, which you should read to find out more about the cookies we use. View cookies policy.